Drinking Water Week

Drinking Water Week

The City of Evanston invites the community to support National Drinking Water Week 2014, May 4th through May 10th, and celebrate water as our most precious natural resource!

Evanston Celebrates 100 Years of National Drinking Water Week With NDWW 2014

For more than 30 years, communities across the United States have joined the American Water Works Association (AWWA) in recognizing the essential role that water plays in our daily lives by celebrating National Drinking Water Week.  Throughout the week, AWWA and its partners provide information and host activities to highlight how important water is for us all.  This year Evanston has chosen the theme “100 Years of Clean Water” to recognize how vital water has been and will continue to be in our lives, and to acknowledge  the Water Department’s productive and successful efforts to provide clean, safe, and reliable drinking water to our community for the last century.

Celebrate NDWW with the City

By 1897, the water utility could pump 12 million gallons per day of untreated lake water. In 1911, the water utility started using hypochlorite of lime to disinfect water and improve safety. The momentous development came in 1913, when construction began on a plant that would provide the city with 12 million gallons per day of filtered and disinfected water. This was the first water treatment plant of its kind to be constructed along the shores of Lake Michigan Water treatment from 1914 on largely eliminated typhoid and other waterborne diseases from the city. Because of its superior water supply, many families were inspired to move to Evanston. Today, this plant is a critical part of Evanston’s award-winning commitment to public health.

Throughout the week, the city will sponsor a series of activities for all ages in honor of National Drinking Water Week. Save the date for the following events and keep an eye out for a variety of exciting contests and activities.

3rd Grade Coloring Contest

The City of Evanston is hosting an art contest as part of National Drinking Water Week 2014 (May 4th -10th).  The purpose of NDWW 14 is to celebrate water by recognizing the essential role it plays in our daily lives. The City will host the art contest for 3rd grade students in Evanston schools/ community organizations with the goal of education and promotion around drinking water. Online voting will occur from March 27th to April 6th. The winners will be announced on April 28th at the Administration & Public Works Committee Meeting of the Evanston City Council and will be invited to attend the presentation of the award. Awards will include Evanston Beach Token(s) for the 2014 summer, a plaque recognizing their achievement, and a chance to have their artwork displayed at the Main Public Library during Drinking Water Week.

This year’s theme is “100 Years of Clean Water.”  For more details, please refer to the handout here: Art Contest Handout 2014.docx

Middle School Photo Contest

Celebrate Water. Snap a Photo. Tag & Share.
The National Drinking Water Week photo contest is open to all 6th – 8th graders in Evanston. Following the submission period, all Evanston residents will have the ability to vote online for their favorite photo. Public voting is scheduled to begin on March 27th and will last until April 6th. Winners will be announced at the City Council meeting on April 28th and have their photo featured on the city’s website and at the Evanston Public Library.

Photo submissions should capture the theme of celebrating “100 Years of Clean Water” and can touch upon topics like ways to reduce water use, promote local tap water, or honor our local water resources and history. For more details, please refer to the handout here: Photo Contest Handout 2014.docx

For social media-based submissions (Twitter, Instagram), please also provide us your contact information through this form: https://cityofevanston.wufoo.com/forms/national-drinking-water-week/
 

High School Rain Barrel Art Project 

Students will have a chance to put an artistic twist on the old practice of collecting rain water. Finished pieces will be featured at Evanston’s third annual Green Ball on Friday, May 30th.

Events & Activities

The City is pleased to provide most events free of charge. Events that require registration and payment are indicated below (Admission Fee).  You may register for these classes and events in person at the Ecology Center, by phone at 847-448-8256, or online.  

Sunset Paddle
Sunday, May 4th, 5 – 7pm, Evanston Ecology Center

Explore water in a different way! Join in for a paddle as we enjoy the North Shore Channel (canal) at dusk. The evening will start off at the Ecology Center with safety and canoe instruction and followed by paddle on the canal until twilight. Maximum two adults and two children (ages 5 and older) in one canoe. (Admission Fee, Adults (12 yrs & up): $20 EEA member / $22 Resident / $24 Non-Resident; Children 5-11 yrs:$10)

After-School Activities
Monday, May 5th – Friday May 9th, 3:30 – 5:00pm, Evanston Ecology Center

Celebrate National Drinking Water Week with a splash! For students K-5, join Ecology Center staff for fun after-school activities. We’ll explore the wonderful history, properties, and uses of water. Each day will have a different theme and self-guided activities, so make sure to stop by all week.

Drinking Water Trivia Contest
Monday, May 5th, 10am – 1pm, Levy Senior Center 
Wednesday, May 7th, 11am – 2pm, Levy Senior Center

Join the Levy Senior Center and Greg Simetz from Right at Home for a drinking water trivia contest. Participants will be asked trivia questions and with each correct answer can win a prize!

Water Sports Events
Monday, May 5th, 4 – 6pm, Chandler-Newberger Center
Wednesday, May 7th, 4 – 6pm, Chandler-Newberger Center

The Chandler-Newberger Center will be hosting two water sports events in honor of National Drinking Water Week. On Monday, May 5th from 4:00 – 6:00pm, test your agility and knowledge with “Water Relays.” On Wednesday, May 7th from 4:00 – 6:00pm, represent a favorite country and try to medal at the “Water Olympics.” Prizes will be available for both events, and they are free for youth in grades K-5.

Rain Barrel Workshop
Wednesday, May 7th, 6:30pm, Evanston Ecology Center

Water becomes an important resource as we approach the warm, dry months of summer. Learn about the ancient, but practical art of collecting rain water at this rain barrel workshop. (Admission Fee, $12 per person 18 yrs. & up)

Green Drinks
Thursday, May 8th, 6pm – 8pm, Firehouse Grill

Join the discussion about drinking water issues with a featured speaker.

Art Viewing & History of Evanston’s Water System Presentation
Sunday, May 11, TBD,  Evanston Public Library

Come view the fabulous entries and winners from the City’s art and photo contests. Additionally, learn about “100 Years of Clean Water” with a presentation and Q&A. Don’t forget to check out the Drinking Water Week display!

Protect the Tap

It is important to treat our water resources with care, and ensure we have clean water supplies for the future. Celebrate this exciting week by learning more about our water and what you can do to protect it. Here are a few small steps we can take to make sure that our water systems are as clean as possible:

  • Don't waste the good stuff! Use the Drip Calculator from the American Water Works Association to estimate water waste and cut down on leaks in your home.
  • http://www.awwa.org/resources-tools/public-affairs/public-information/dripcalculator.aspx
  • Look for safer alternatives to control weeds and bugs, and reduce or eliminate your use of pesticides or fertilizers as they can travel through runoff and soil and contaminate ground water.
  • Recycle or properly dispose of used motor oil, grease and parts cleaners, and antifreeze. One quart of motor oil can contaminate more than 250,000 gallons of water.
  • Use non-toxic cleaning and household products whenever possible.
  • Volunteer with a beach, stream, or wetlands cleanup project.
  • Properly dispose of prescription medications and other products that are too often flushed into the wastewater system and out to the environment.