Make a Kit

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EFD_Ready EvanstonThere are various types of emergency kits that are suited for different needs:

Don’t wait; start to put a kit together today!

Household (whole family) Disaster Kit

A household (whole family) disaster kit is a larger kit usually not intended to be portable to take with you.  Along with a household disaster kit, each member of the household should have a smaller individual (personal) kit that is smaller and portable and meant to be grabbed and taken with the individual.

A household kit is a collection of food, water and other emergency supplies to allow you to be self-sustaining at home following an emergency.  A household kit should provide enough food and water for each person for a minimum of 3 days; however 7 to 10 days is highly recommended.  There should be enough water to equal 1 gallon of water per person per day.

Kits can be purchased commercially or simply put together in a bin or large utility bag.  Kits should be stored indoors.  Make sure and rotate food and water as necessary.

Individual (personal) Disaster Kit

An individual (personal) disaster kit is meant to be portable and sustain the individual for 3 to 5 days.  Along with small portable individual kits, you should have a household (whole family) disaster kit.

An individual disaster kit should be in a duffle bag or backpack and kept within easy access of the individual (such as next to or under a bed or by a door).  An individual kit should contain at a minimum:

  • At least one change of clothes plus a sweatshirt, lightweight jacket, hoodie or similar clothing item in case it’s needed.
  • A pair of sturdy closed toe shoes
  • A flashlight
  • Over the counter analgesics (e.g. Motrin, Ibuprofen, etc.)
  • 3 to 5 day supply of an prescription medications the individual takes
  • Small individual first aid kit or supplies (e.g. adhesive bandages, antiseptic wipes, etc.)
  • Snacks or small food items (such as protein or granola bars)
  • Writing paper along with pens or pencils
  • Comfort items (e.g. toys or coloring books for children, books to read, games to play, etc.) 

Vehicle Disaster Kit

A vehicle disaster kit is meant to be portable and sustain the individual for up to 3 days.  It is meant to allow occupants of the vehicle to survive if the vehicle becomes stuck in a storm or to take with them if the occupants must abandon the vehicle on foot.

A vehicle disaster kit should be in a duffle bag or backpack.  A vehicle kit should contain at a minimum:

  • A blanket (mylar emergency blankets are the best solution, they are small, lightweight and inexpensive, you can have easily have at least one mylar emergency blanket for each potential passenger in the vehicle).
  • A pair of comfortable closed toe shoes for walking (in case you need to abandon the vehicle on foot and wearing inappropriate footwear)
  • A flashlight
  • Over the counter analgesics (e.g. Motrin, Ibuprofen, etc.)
  • Small individual first aid kit or supplies (e.g. adhesive bandages, antiseptic wipes, etc.)
  • 3 days’ worth of food and water (US Coast Guard approved emergency rations are a perfect solution for this, they are small and have up to a 5 year shelf life)
  • Writing paper along with pens or pencils

NOTE: If you are stuck in a storm, it is best to remain with the vehicle until help arrives; attempting to leave the vehicle in a storm is dangerous and should only be a last resort. 

Workplace Personal Disaster Kit

A workplace personal disaster kit is meant to be small enough to keep under your desk and portable enough to take with you.  It should sustain the individual for 3 to 5 days.

A workplace personal disaster kit should be in a duffle bag or backpack and kept under your desk or in a cabinet at work.  A workplace kit should contain at a minimum:

  • A sweatshirt, lightweight jacket, hoodie or similar clothing item in case its needed.
  • A pair of comfortable closed toe walking shoes (to replace typical office footwear if you need to walk long distances following an emergency)
  • A flashlight
  • Over the counter analgesics (e.g. Motrin, Ibuprofen, etc.)
  • 3 to 5 day supply of an prescription medications the individual takes
  • Small individual first aid kit or supplies (e.g. adhesive bandages, antiseptic wipes, etc.)
  • 3 days’ worth of food and water (US Coast Guard approved emergency rations are a perfect solution for this, they are small and have up to a 5 year shelf life)
  • Writing paper along with pens or pencils